Plants of commercial importance

From Biodiversity of India
Jump to: navigation, search
* Click on the arrows besides the column headers to sort the table by that column

* Clicking on the blue links will lead you to the respective pages

If some information is missing or you think is wrong, YOU CAN CHANGE IT YOURSELF!!! Click here to know how...

A total of 48 plants having commercial importance as YES

Images of commercially important plants

48 species in this category.

List of plants

Species nameCommon nameName in HindiIntrodescriptionCommercial applicationPlant commercial partCommercial use description
Azolla pinnataMosquito fern, Duckweed fern, Fairy moss, Water fernAnimal consumption
Agricultural use
Azolla has been used, for at least one thousand years, in rice paddies as a companion plant, because of its ability to both fix nitrogen, and block out light to prevent any competition from other plants, aside from the rice, which is planted when tall enough to poke out of the water through the azolla layer. When rice paddies are flooded in the spring, they can be inoculated with Azolla, which then quickly multiplies to cover the water, suppressing weeds. The rotting plant material releases nitrogen to the rice plants, providing up to nine tonnes of protein per hectare per year. The nitrogen fixing ability of Azolla is due to the cyanobacteria in the plant. It can replace 25-30 kg nitrogen per hectare as applied through ammonium sulfate.
Madhuca longifoliaMahuaमहुआ MahuaMadhuca longifolia, commonly known as mahwa or mahua, is an Indian tropical tree found largely in the central and north Indian plains and forests. It is a fast growing tree that grows to approximately 20 meters in height, possesses evergreen or semi-evergreen foliage, and belongs to the family Sapotaceae. It is adapted to arid environments, being a prominent tree in tropical mixed deciduous forests in India in the states of Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Kerala, Gujarat and Orissa (Source: Wikipedia)Human consumption
Medicinal use
Religious use
Wood
Root
Stem
Bark
Leaves
Flower
Seeds
About 30-40 percent of the tribal economy in north India such as in Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Orissa is dependent on the mahua seeds and flowers. The tree has a potential of enhancing rural income. (Hindu) Madhuca indica (syn. Madhuca latifolia, Bassia latifolia,) is a deciduous tree found in India. It bears edible flowers and fruit. The tree has a spreading root system so can be used to prevent soil erosion. The timber is hard and is used in construction. Bark of the tree is known to have medicinal properties. Seed is rich in oil and has been used in soap and candle making. Seed cake is used as an organic fertilizer. M. indica is being explored as a potential source of biofuel. (NCBI Taxonomy)
Santalum albumIndian Sandalwood, White Sandalwoodचन्दन ChandanSandalwood is an economically important plant and has been cultivated for several centuries for the fragrance of its oil. Due to extensive and sometimes, illegal cutting of native Sandalwood trees, this species has become vulnerable to extinction. S. album is native to South/South-East Asia, possibly Indonesia. Another species Santalum spicatum is native to Australia.Human consumption
Medicinal use
Cosmetic use
Religious use
Wood
Almost all of the sandalwood oil in the world is produced from the S.album. The highest content is in the roots followed by the heartwood. Sandalwood oil is used in high-quality perfumes and cosmetics and Ayurvedic creams. India is the largest producer of Sandalwood. Production is based almost entirely on exploitation of wild trees.

Sandalwood is also popular as carving wood and for making souvenirs and toys. The wood is used in religious practices in Hinduism.

The cotyledons and kernel of sandal seeds contain a fixed oil which has drying properties. Oil-free sandal seed meal is rich in protein and could be utilized as an animal feed if available in sufficient quantities.

The oil may also be used as a food additive (GRIN)
Nelumbo nuciferaWater Lily, Lotus, Sacred Lotus, East Indian Lotusकमल KamalThe Indian Lotus, also known as the Sacred Lotus, is a culturally significant plant in many Asian cultures in general and Indian culture in particular. It is a plant native to the Indian subcontinent, but now is found as an ornamental plant worldwide. The Lotus is considered a symbol of devotion and purity. It is the seat of Goddess Lakshmi, Goddess Saraswati, Lord Vishnu and Lord Brahma. The flowers of Lotus have several medicinal properties as per Ayurveda. Lotus is also the national flower of India.Human consumption
Ornamental use
Religious use
Entire plant
Root
Rhizomes
Stem
Leaves
Flower
Fruit
Seeds
Almost all parts of the plant have medicinal and culinary uses as previously described. The plant is also a prized ornamental plant, especially in artificial ponds.
Hygrophila auriculataHygrophila, Temple plant, Marsh Barbelतालीम ख़ाना Talim KhanaHygrophila auriculata is belongs to the genus Hygrophila whose identity as a separate genus is still debated. H. auriculata is an aquatic, perennial herb which has medicinal properties in treating liver ailments according to Ayurveda.Medicinal use
Ornamental use
Entire plant
Root
Leaves
Seeds
As described previously, the plant parts can be used to treat liver ailments. In addition, the plant also bears beautiful blue-colored flowers and hence can be used in aquariums and artificial ponds as an ornamental plant.
Achillea millefoliumCommon Yarrow, Gordaldo, Nosebleed plant, Old man's pepper, Devil's nettle, Sanguinary, Milfoil, Soldier's woundwort, Thousand-leaf, Thousand-seal.Gandrain, Puthkanda, भूतकॆशी Bhut KesiAchillea millefolium or yarrow is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae, native to the Northern Hemisphere. In antiquity, yarrow was known as herbal militaris, for its use in staunching the flow of blood from wounds. Yarrows can be planted to combat soil erosion due to the plant's resistance to drought. They are used for human consumption and medicinal uses in many cultures around the world. (Source:Wikipedia)Human consumption
Animal consumption
Medicinal use
Other use
Can be used to prevent soil erosion
Cocos nuciferaCoconutनारियल NaariyalHuman consumption
Animal consumption
Agricultural use
Cosmetic use
Ornamental use
Religious use
Industrial use
Wood
Root
Stem
Bark
Leaves
Fruit
Coconut leaves are used for making brooms. Bark and coir (fruit hair) used for making brooms, ropes, mattresses, brushes and even as potting compost. Fruit is used in several food preparations, most notably chutneys and coconut sweets.Coconut milk is rich in fatty acids (17% fat content) and used for making hair oils and edible oils.

The dried calyx of the coconut is used as fuel in wood fired stoves.

The fresh husk of a brown coconut is also used as a dish sponge or as a body sponge.Coconut roots are used as a dye and a mouthwash.Coconut trunks are used for building small bridges; they are preferred for their straightness, strength and salt resistance. In Kerala (India), coconut trunks are used for house construction.The husk and shells can be used for fuel and are a source of charcoal.
Ceratopteris pteridoidesFloating antlerfernCeratopteris species are aquatic pteridophytic ferns, generally found in tropical regions. They require a warm climate and lots of water. Two species - C. pteridoides and C. thalictroides are found in India. There is confusion among botanists on whether Ceratopteris cornuta and C. pteridoides are separate species.Ornamental useOtherEntire plant is used as an ornamental plant in aquariums.
Jasminum sambacJasmineबेला Bela, मोतिया Motiya, मोगरा MograJasminum sambac is a species of jasmine native to southwestern and southern Asia, in the Philippines, India, Myanmar and Sri Lanka. It is grown mainly as an ornamental plant due to its fragrant and beautiful flowers.Human consumption
Ornamental use
Flavouring agent: to flavour tea in China, Making Perfumes,for making garlands and bouquets and for religious offerings.
Murraya exoticaChinese box, Orange JasmineKamini कामिनीThis species is used sometimes as an ornamental plant in India and has a medicinal use. Murraya exotica is related to Murraya koenigii or Curry plant, which is used as a spice in Indian foods. M. exotica leaves, on the other hand, have a citrus flavor.Medicinal use
Ornamental use
Wood
Other use
Entire plant
Stem
Leaves
It is a popular hedge plant in tropics. It can be pruned into various shapes of animals and can be used as a garden ornamental plant. It can also be cultivated as a bonsai. Can also be grown indoors.

The wood of the plant is soft and can be used for making small, fine-tuned items.

Orange Jasmine contributes to biodiversity, protects the soil, furnishes food and cover for wildlife. It also has medicinal use as previously described.
… further results

Click on further results on bottom right corner of the above table to get an exhaustive list

The code used to generate the above table

{{#ask: [[Category:Plants]] [[Plant commercial::Yes]]
| ?Common name
| ?Common hindi name=Name in Hindi
| ?Introdescription
| ?Commercial application
| ?Plant commercial part
| ?Commercial use description
| limit=10
| sort=Commercial use description
| mainlabel=Species name
}}