Acinonyx jubatus

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Cheetah
Species name: Acinonyx jubatus
The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) is an atypical member of the cat family (Felidae) that is unique in its speed, while lacking strong climbing abilities. The species is the only living member of the genus Acinonyx. It is the fastest land animal, reaching speeds between 112 and 120 km/h in short bursts covering distances up to 460 m, and has the ability to accelerate from 0 to 103 km/h in three seconds, faster than most supercars. The word "cheetah" is derived from the Sanskrit word citrakāyaḥ, meaning "variegated", via the Hindi चीता cītā. It is possible, though doubtful, that some cheetahs remain in India. The popular belief is that Cheetahs are extinct in India since 1940s. (Source:Wikipedia)


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Parameter Value(s) References
See complete references in the References section at the end
Names of users who have contributed to this species page Gauravm
Date on which this page was first created 2011/02/09
This page was last modified on: 10 February 2011 04:59:12
Name of the species Acinonyx jubatus Link to page on Wikipedia
ID on Encyclopedia of Life 328680 Link to page on EoL
Synonyms Please check Binomial Classification section for synonyms.
Common English Names Cheetah
Common Hindi Names
Common Indian names
Origins/Meanings of the common names The word "cheetah" is derived from the Sanskrit word citrakāyaḥ, meaning "variegated", via the Hindi चीता cītā. The genus name, Acinonyx, means "no-move-claw" in Greek, while the species name, jubatus, means "maned" in Latin, a reference to the mane found in cheetah cubs. Wikipedia entry

Taxonomy from Encyclopedia of Life

{{#EoLOnlyHierarchy:328680}} 

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Taxonomy filled in form

Taxon Value
Regnum (Kingdom) Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Mammalia
Order Carnivora
Family Felidae
Genus Acinonyx
Source of data EoL

Other closely related species

SpeciesDivision/PhylumCommon nameCommon Hindi name
Moschus chrysogasterChordataAlpine Musk Deer
Crocidura andamanensisChordataAndaman shrew
Crocidura hispidaChordataAndaman spiny shrew
… further results
DivisionTaxon detailsTaxon morphology details
ChordataThe phylum Chordata consists of three subphyla: Urochordata, represented by tunicates; Cephalochordata, represented by lancelets; and Craniata, which includes Vertebrata. Chordates are monophyletic, meaning that Chordata contains all and only the descendants of a single common ancestor which is itself a chordate, and that craniates' nearest relatives are cephalochordates. The Chordates arose from a more general superphylum Deuterostomia, which consists of Chordata, Hemichordata,Echinodermata and Xenoturbellida. The Deuterostomes split from Protostomes ~550 mya in the Cambrian era. It is supposed that Chordates arose in the Mid-Cambrian period, however there is controversy regarding that. The controversy arises mainly due to the fact that fossils of early chordates are very rare.Chordates form a phylum of creatures that are based on a bilateral body plan, and is defined by having at some stage in their lives all of the following: 1) A notochord, 2) A dorsal neural tube 3) Pharyngeal slits 4) A muscular tail that extends backwards behind the anus and 5) An endostyle
SpeciesClassCommon nameCommon Hindi name
Moschus chrysogasterMammaliaAlpine Musk Deer
Crocidura andamanensisMammaliaAndaman shrew
Crocidura hispidaMammaliaAndaman spiny shrew
… further results
ClassTaxon detailsTaxon morphology details
MammaliaDepending on classification scheme, there are approximately 5,500 species (5,490, according to the IUCN Red List) of mammals, distributed in about 1,200 genera, 153 families, 29 orders The early synapsid mammalian ancestors, a group which included pelycosaurs such as Dimetrodon, diverged from the amniote line that would lead to reptiles at the end of the Carboniferous period. Although they were preceded by many diverse groups of non-mammalian synapsids (sometimes misleadingly referred to as mammal-like reptiles), the first true mammals appeared 220 million years ago in the Triassic period.Mammals are a class of air-breathing vertebrate animals characterized by the (1) possession of hair, (2) three middle ear bones -malleus, incus and stapes, (3) a neocortex, and (4) mammary glands functional in mothers with young. Mammalian fossils, however, are identified by the presence of the incus and malleus bones in the middle ear. Most mammals also possess sweat glands and specialized teeth, and the largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta which feeds the offspring during gestation. The mammalian brain regulates endothermic and circulatory systems, including a four-chambered heart. Mammals range in size from the 30–40 millimeter (1- to 1.5-inch) Bumblebee Bat to the 33-meter (108-foot) Blue Whale. (Source:Wikipedia)
SpeciesOrderCommon nameCommon Hindi name
Catopuma temminckiiCarnivoraAsian Golden Cat, Temminck's Golden Cat
Ursus thibetanusCarnivoraAsiatic Black bear,White-chested bear,Moon bear
Vulpes bengalensisCarnivoraBengal Fox
… further results
OrderTaxon detailsTaxon morphology details
CarnivoraCarnivorans are primarily terrestrial and usually have strong sharp claws, with never fewer than four toes on each foot, and well-developed, prominent canine teeth, cheek teeth (premolars and molars) that generally have cutting edges. The teeth structure and the skull architectures of Carnivores are among their distibguishing features. Members of Carnivora have diverse food habits, although many are primarily carnivorous, and carnivory is widely distributed in mammals, being found in many other orders including Chiroptera, Metatheria, Primates, and Cetacea.
SpeciesFamilyCommon nameCommon Hindi name
Catopuma temminckiiFelidaeAsian Golden Cat, Temminck's Golden Cat
Caracal caracalFelidaeCaracal, Persian Cat
Acinonyx jubatusFelidaeCheetah
… further results
SpeciesGenusCommon nameCommon Hindi name
Acinonyx jubatusAcinonyxCheetah

Based on classification

More details can be found in the Binomial Classification section.

Information from Encyclopedia of Life

{{#EoLOnlyEcology:328680|Physical description~Description}} If nothing is displayed above in this section, it means the EoL ID has not been defined OR the EoL API service is down. If former, please click on Edit with form button on top and follow the instructions for filling in the EoL ID

General morphology

Parameter Value(s) References
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General morphological features of the animal

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IUCN Conservation Status Extinct in the Wild
(See section External Links to find link to the page on IUCN website)
Indian States in which the species has been documented
Locations at which the species has been documented
Biotic zones inhabited
Details about the habitat
Is this species native to India?
Is the species indigenous/endemic to Sub-Himalayan regions?
Is the species indigenous/endemic to Western Ghats?
Is the species indigenous/endemic to Eastern Ghats?

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Information from Encyclopedia of Life

{{#EoLOnlyEcology:328680|Reproduction~Lifespan, longevity, and ageing~Food Habits~Functional adaptation~Behavior}}

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Life cycle
Life expectancy
Food habits and feeding strategies
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Pests and Diseases

Information from Encyclopedia of Life 500px-Status iucn3.1.png

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Parameter Value(s) References
See complete references in the References section at the end
IUCN Status Extinct in the Wild
(See section External Links to find link to the page on IUCN website)
Conservation sanctuaries in India
Details of threats to conservation of this species
Means of management of conservation, national and international laws Cheetahs have been known to exist in India for a very long time, but as a result of hunting and other causes, cheetahs have been extinct in India since the 1940s. A captive propagation project has been proposed. Minister of Environment and Forests Jairam Ramesh told the Rajya Sabha on 7 July 2009, "The cheetah is the only animal that has been described extinct in India in the last 100 years. We have to get them from abroad to repopulate the species." He was responding to a call for attention from Rajiv Pratap Rudy of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP). "The plan to bring back the cheetah, which fell to indiscriminate hunting and complex factors like a fragile breeding pattern is audacious given the problems besetting tiger conservation." Two naturalists, Divya Bhanusinh and MK Ranjit Singh, suggested importing cheetahs from Africa, after which they will be bred in captivity and, in time, released in the wild. Wikipedia

Parameter Value(s) References
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Does this species have any cultural significance?
Religions which mention/give significance to this species
Cultural and religious occasions when this species is used
Details of historical, cultural and mythological use

Pubmed Word cloud

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{{#queryDB:taxonomy |Acinonyx jubatus }}

  • If there is an error message above, it means that there is no retrievable information available on NCBI
  • If the number of nucleotide sequences is less than 100, very little genomic work has been done on this species. A respectable number of nucleotide sequences is above 500.
  • Most of the nucleotide sequences may come from three sources:
  1. Studies on single genes, where people try to sequence genes such as some specific dehydrogenases important,say, for tannin production
  2. Sequences of Ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer, whose sequence is used for generating molecular phylogenetic trees to establish species relationships
  3. Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) which can tell about which genes are present and expressed in the species at a particular time in the given tissue


References

Wikipedia (Web): Wikipedia entry, Accessdate=2010-02-9

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