Division:Mammals

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Division:Mammals

Facts about us and our fellow cousins

Recently added Mammalian species

The mammalian species pages which were recently created are listed here automatically. A total of 360 mammalian species in the database as of this moment. 129 have some information filled in.
Crocidura andamanensis (Andaman shrew), Crocidura attenuata (Asian grey shrew), Crocidura fuliginosa (Southeast Asian Shrew), Crocidura nicobarica (Nicobar Shrew), Crocidura hispida (Andaman spiny shrew), Crocidura pullata (Dusky shrew), Crocidura pergrisea (Kashmir rock shrew), Crocidura jenkinsi (Jenkin's Shrew), Ovis vignei (Urial, Arkars, Shapo), Pseudois nayaur (Bharal, Himalayan blue sheep, Naur, भराल Bharal), Ovis ammon (Argali, Mountain sheep, Marco Polo sheep), Naemorhedus sumatraensis (Serow, Himalayan Serow), Naemorhedus goral (Himalayan Goral, Gray Goral), Capra falconeri (Markhor), Budorcas taxicolor (Takin), Capra sibirica (Siberian Ibex), Tetracerus quadricornis (Four Horned antelope, Chousingha), Boselaphus tragocamelus (Nilgai,Blue bull, Nilgai), Bubalis bubalis (Water buffalo,Wild Asian buffalo,Wild Asiatic buffalo, भैंस Bhains), Bos grunniens (Yak,Grunting ox) … further results

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Recently added community pages

Our Division:Community pages aims to document indigenous practices and the myriad cultural associations of Indian Biodiversity. Please take some time to browse through and leave feedback!
Page titleAuthorTopicState discussed, if anySpecies group, if any
Wolf in Indian cultureGaurav MogheMythology and religionPan-IndiaMammals
Why Lord Ganesha has a mouse as his vehicleGaurav MogheMythology and religionPan-IndiaMammals
Varaha (boar) avatar of VishnuGaurav MogheMythological storiesPan-IndiaMammals
The Asiatic Lion in Indian cultureGaurav MogheMythology and religionPan-IndiaMammals
Satyanarayan pooja and biodiversityGaurav MogheMythology and religionPan-IndiaMammals
Salman Khan and the sacred Blackbuck episodeGaurav MogheIndigenous practicesRajasthanMammals
Maldhari tribe and their clash with lion conservationGaurav MogheLocals vs conservationGujaratMammals
How Lord Ganesha got his elephant headGaurav MogheMythology and religionPan-IndiaMammals
Goddess Ganga and the Gangetic DolphinGaurav MogheMythology and religionPan-IndiaMammals
Elephant in indian cultureGaurav MogheMythology and religionPan-IndiaMammals

Did you know?

Dolphins are being trained by the US Military for underwater surveillance purposes, among others
Dolphins (Delphinus delphis) are among the most intelligent mammals in the world after humans. Dolphins are aquatic mammals closely related to whales and porpoises. Interestingly, the closest land relative of aquatic mammals is the hippopotamus. The lineages leading to whales and hippopotamuses diverged ~55 million years ago.
Several species of Dolphins are found in Indian territorial waters including some river species such as the Ganges River Dolphin. These species look different from the image alongside (of the Bottlenose Dolphin), which is the image in the popular imagination. Nevertheless, Dolphins are highly intelligent creatures, with a brain to body ratio only second to that of humans. Dolphins display creative behavior, have been shown to make rudimentary use of tools and are able to communicate with other individuals through clicks and whistles. It has been suggested recently that dolphins, given their highly intelligent behaviors, should be treated as non-human mammals.
Unfortunately, dolphins in India are all endangered species. The freshwater dolphin species face threats from pollution of the rivers, construction of dams and hunting. Ironically, Dolphin is considered as a vehicle of Goddess Ganga, but we are doing little to protect the species. Unless something serious is done to save these intelligent creatures, our children and grandchildren may never get to see these magnificent creatures freely swimming in Indian waters.

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